Prashant Modi and Great Eastern Energy Corporation Limited

Great Eastern Energy Corporation Limited was the first Indian Company to be listed on the London Stock Market. The pioneering enterprise to extract methane gas from West Bengal coal-bed blocks began in 2007. Until that time, no other Indian company had attempted this. Prashant Modi joined the company in 1996 and has overseen the operation. He is the company President and Officer in charge of operations.

Production Profile: Coal Bed Methane

Coal Bed Methane (CBM) is farmable for decades. This indicates a fairly sustainable energy source. After a slow start, with fairly low production, there is a peak in the amount Prashant Modi GEECLbeing produced. The amount being farmed will start to drop after approximately 25-30 years.

The gas being produced is economical, when compared to some of the alternatives being used in the region. Once popular furnace oil for example, is more expensive than CBM and dirtier to use. There are limits to how long people can use such energies because they are so unclean. CBM however, is extremely clean to use, as it contains 97 per cent methane.

History

Prashant Modi, signed an agreement with Indian Oil in 2007. This allowed the company to begin widening their distribution network by building a pipeline to service other regions in West Bengal. Gas was also sold from several of Indian Oil’s petrol stations.

The first wells were set up in Raniganj and production was experimental at first. Over time, the process was perfected. Initially, there were only several industrial companies being supplied with the gas. The demand for sustainable energy in India continues to grow. Great Eastern has plans to ramp up production of Coal Bed Methane to supply the demand.

Once way to do this, has been by actively acquiring more coal-bed blocks for drilling. Secondly, the company have widened the supply network to other areas of West Bengal. This year, much of the hard work has paid off and GEECL have enjoyed considerable financial growth. In the future, the plans are for the company to continue to grow, by producing more CBM and distributing it to consumers. The aim is for more blocks to be secured and drilled.

Prashant Modi – Investing in Natural Gas

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Oil and Gas natural gas drill (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife) – Prashant Modi

Those who wish to invest in publically traded natural gas companies usually find themselves presented with a huge amount of rather confusing information on the topic, which can often serve as a deterrent to understanding, and therefore being able to analyse the sector. Here, Prashant Modi provides some simple explanations on the most common terms and concepts surrounding natural gas investments.

The term ‘reserves’ is often used by investors in this sector; this refers to the quantity of natural gas which an energy company has on its land. These hydrocarbon reserves are then categorised as possible, probable or proved. According to Prashant Modi, the most significant reserve category from an investor’s perspective is the ‘proved’ one. Proved reserves are defined as those which engineering and geological data have determined to be recoverable from the energy companies reservoirs, based on the current operating conditions, government regulations and economic methods. The economic viability of these proved reserves has to be based on the average price of them over the course of twelve months.

The majority of natural gas companies will present the amount of proved reserves in their marketing materials; however Prashant Modi says that investors should be aware that the prices the companies use may be based on different calculations, and as such should always be compared with the price of proved reserves of other companies before an investment is made. With possible or probable reserves, natural gas companies are usually given the option of disclosing the prices in regulatory filings however because there is uncertainty surrounding these two categories, Prashant Modi says that investors should not rely too heavily upon these figures.

Another frequently used term in natural gas investment circles is ‘reserves to production ratio’; this is the measurement of the amount of time it would take in years, for an energy company to produce all of its proven reserves. As a general rule of thumb, a higher ratio is more beneficial for an investor. Lastly, a term which Prashant Modi says all natural gas investors should know is ‘basis differentials’; this refers to the price discounts available in certain regions, which some companies experience during the process of selling natural gas to the market; these discounts are affected by many different factors including the quality of the natural gas, the regional demand, the capacity of the natural gas pipeline and the weather.

natural gas rig

natural gas rig (Photo credit: jermlac) – Prashant Modi